Zendium is clinically proven to balance the oral microbiome*

What is the microbiome and why does it matter?

The mouth houses a diverse population of microorganisms known as the oral microbiome. Organisms associated with health exist side-by-side with those associated with disease. Maintaining a state of harmony within this population is crucial, to prevent the overgrowth of disease-associated bacteria and keep oral problems at bay.

Zendium is clinically proven to balance the microbiome*

Zendium is a revolutionary approach to oral care that improves oral health by balancing the oral microbiome.* In ground-breaking clinical research published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports, Adams et al. tested Zendium against a standard fluoride toothpaste without enzymes and proteins to evaluate its effect on bacterial species in the mouth.
The results were striking: After 14 weeks of use, Zendium shifted the balance of the oral microbiome towards a state of health, reflecting:

  • a significant increase in the proportion of gum health-associated bacterial species
  • a significant decrease in the proportion of gum disease-associated species.

These effects were not seen with the standard fluoride toothpaste.

Zendium petridish results

Real data visualistion**

Zendium boosts good bacteria

Like the natural defences in saliva, the enzymes in Zendium are able to help boost health-associated aerobic bacteria. For example, the proportion of Neisseria species (aerobic bacteria associated with gum health) increased in the study, while the proportion of anaerobic species such as Treponemes decreased.

Findings driven by pioneering technology

Early experimental techniques limited researchers to detecting microbes that could be grown in a laboratory environment. In contrast, this clinical study was carried out in collaboration with leading centres and experts in genomic research and used DNA sequencing technology to get a picture of all bacterial species in the mouth, not only those that could be grown via culture-based techniques.


A literature review then assigned the species as health- or disease-associated. Where no information was available, the species were considered to have ‘no known association’.
The study was the first of its kind to show, at species level, that a toothpaste can help to balance the oral microbiome, protecting the mouth naturally. You can read the full publication at the journal website here.

*Refers to the oral plaque microbiome and the relative abundance of bacterial species with a known association with gum health or disease after 14 weeks of brushing twice a day with Zendium when compared to baseline.
** Data visualisation of bacterial species with a known association with gum health or gum disease, whose relative abundance changed significantly over 14 weeks of brushing twice a day compared to baseline