Zendium patients
défenses naturelles

ZENDIUM AND YOUR PATIENTS

ZENDIUM AND YOUR PATIENTS

PATIENTS AT RISK OF AN IMBALANCED MICROBIOME

Several factors can lead to an imbalanced microbiome, increasing the risk of caries and periodontitis.1 Changes such as pregnancy,2 the menopause,3 stress,4 depression4 or ageing,5 and lifestyle factors like diet,6 smoking6 and medications,4 can disrupt the natural balance of the oral microbiome.

In such patients, oral care should focus on promoting a balanced microbiome.

Imbalanced microbiome

PATIENTS SUFFERING FROM GUM PROBLEMS

An imbalanced microbiome, with a relative increase in pathogenic species, can lead to the early stages of gum disease.8 The resulting inflammation causes pathogenic bacteria to multiply, and gum disease can worsen.

In such patients, oral care should focus on re-establishing the balance.1

Gum problems

PATIENTS WITH A SENSITIVE ORAL MUCOSA

Patients with sensitive mouths, such as those with aphthous ulcers9 or those who have undergone oral procedures,10 could benefit from a toothpaste without SLS.11,12 Toothpastes without SLS are also recommended for patients with dry mouth.13

Zendium has a mild formulation without SLS.14

Sensitive oral mucosa

CHILDREN

Children have a higher density of taste buds than adults,15 so they can be sensitive to strong flavours and can find toothpastes with strong tastes or foams unpleasant. Children are also prone to mouth ulcers,16 making their delicate mouths more sensitive.

Zendium Kids & Juniors have a mild flavour and are without SLS.

Children

PATIENTS SEEKING A NATURAL APPROACH TO ORAL CARE

Some patients may be looking for an oral care regime that works in harmony with their body.

Zendium’s formulation contains a combination of natural enzymes and proteins reflecting some of thouse found in saliva.7 Zendium contains 0% triclosan, parabens and SLS.

Natural approach

REFERENCES

  1. Kilian M, et al. Br Dent J 2016; 221:657–666.
  2. Salvolini E, et al. BJOG 1998; 105:656–660.
  3. Suri V & Suri V. J Midlife Health 2014; 5:115–120.
  4. Fabian T, et al. In: Wiley Encyclopaedia of Chemical Biology, vol.2008; 1–9. Begley TP (editor). Hoboken, NJ, USA. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  5. Zaura E & ten Cate JM. Caries Res 2015; 49 Suppl 1:55–61.
  6. Koscielniak D, et al. Acta Biochim Pol 2012; 59:451–457.
  7. van ‘t Hof W, et al. Monogr Oral Sci 2014; 24:40–51.
  8. Lamont RJ & Hajishengallis G. Trends Mol Med 2015; 21:172–183.
  9. Shim Y, et al. Oral Dis 2012; 18:655–660.
  10. Kvam E, et al. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 1987; 15:104–107.
  11. Slebioda Z, et al. Postepy Dermatol Alergol 2013; 30:96–102.
  12. Herlofson BB, et al. J Clin Periodontol. 1996; 23(11):1004-1007.
  13. Jensen JL & Barkvoll P. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1998; 842:156–162.
  14. Arenholdt-Bindslev D, Bleeg HS & Richards A. ATLA 1992; 20:28–38.
  15. Segovia C, et al. Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2002; 138:135–146.
  16. Majorana A, et al. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2010; 110:e13–18.
Back to top